Skip to content

Elon Musk’s Mars Plan: What will it really take for a Mars human mission?

We are all very excited to see the continued growth of SpaceX’s Starship and the new momentum for building Starbase 2 at Cape Canaveral. We are still a long way from seeing this system in full swing.

In the grand scheme of things it won’t be long before we see not only orbital starship launches, but crewed starship missions that will take humanity back to the surface. Deep space flights to the Moon, even longer durations, and eventually Mars And beyond that.

But first, I’m sure you have a lot of questions about how humans can actually survive in long-duration spacecraft, the Moon, deep space flights to even longer durations, and eventually Mars and beyond. For. But first, I’m sure you have a lot of questions about how humans can actually survive in long-duration spacecraft.

SpaceX’s Starship development is something that I’m sure most of you here have been keeping a very close eye on over the years. Even though activity at Starbase has slowed down in the form of test flights in preparation for the first orbital flight test, overall Starship production is really starting. With the construction of a massive new Starfactory facility in Boca Chica to replace the production tent, and the start of Starbase 2 taking shape in Cape Canaveral.

These are all good signs that the primary architecture for the Starship is now in its final stages of testing. With this story and others, it is the first time in nearly half a century that we are actually seeing the beginning of new advances in human space travel. A rocket is big enough, and cost-effective, to throw us into space.

Finally the first moon landing moves on. Fun fact I think people often forget. Apollo 11 was launched on 16 July 1969. After the first successful mission to the Moon, Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16 and 17, with that final mission, returned to Earth on 19 December 1972. Those 6 very successful missions were completed.

Just under 3 and a half years. Can you imagine it again now? Well, we wait, and hope that SpaceX with NASA not only matches up to this astonishing feat, but goes beyond it. However in the last 50 years, we have learned a lot about health issues that we need to guard against.

How will humans survive the period and hostile environment in which they will be kept? Using Mars as an example is a good exercise, because the journey requires time. How we will survive long-duration space flight is a question that is more complex than previously thought.

Sci-fi-driven pop culture and even the Apollo moon landings can leave us with a false sense of security. It’s easy to think that we really need a launch system like Starship and all our deep space dreams finally come true, but diving a little deeper we see that it couldn’t be further from reality.

SpaceX wanted to send a crewless Starship to Mars this year in 2022, but the dates have been pushed back for a variety of reasons. Now, SpaceX is hoping to send cargo ships to Mars by 2024. Back in March, Elon Musk tweeted speculating that humans could set foot on Mars by 2029, with the updated timeline.

Will this conjecture be true? Can they overcome the challenges of human spaceflight so quickly? Cargo missions are simple in comparison, but these squishy delicate human flesh bags? Yes. Very different. NASA has been actively researching how the human body reacts to spacecraft for more than half a century.

Being a lover of the acronym he summed up most of the major risks using the acronym RIDGE. That’s exactly what we’re going to see in this. SpaceX’s Starship development is something that I’m sure most of you here have been keeping a very close eye on over the years.

Even though activity at Starbase has slowed down in the form of test flights in preparation for the first orbital flight test, overall Starship production is really starting. With the construction of a huge new Starfactory facility in Boca Chica to replace the production tent.

With the start of Starbase 2 taking shape at Cape Canaveral, these are all good signs that the primary architecture for Starship is now in its final stages of testing. With this story and others, it is the first time in nearly half a century that we are actually seeing the beginning of new advances in human space travel. A rocket is big enough, and cost-effective to throw us into space and eventually land.

Radiation stands for isolation, distance from Earth, gravity, and environments that are hostile or closed. The first and foremost danger is radiation! Earth has a very good magnetic field that protects everything on it. But once you’re on a starship and on your way to Mars, Earth can’t help you any more.

You alone are traveling millions of kilometers to your destination, bombarded by high energy ionizing radiation. Radiating particles that can literally kick electrons off atoms within cells in your body! Obviously radiation is around us all the time, but not at this magnitude or energy.

Experiencing radiation to an extent is considered completely safe. After all, the sun emits various types of radiation all the time. Visible light as an example. But sometimes the Sun explodes, throwing billions of tons of charged particles into space in one fell swoop.

These are known as CMEs or coronal mass ejections. Although this is fairly unlikely, if a spacecraft comes into direct contact with one of these CMEs, it could be catastrophic. we can predict.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.